Post-Hump Day post: We’re Special, K?

This week, now that we can slowly face the Internet again . . .

> freecycle-aeron-chair-marshmallow-sofaWe laughed at “Me-cycle” requests like these two (from the same person) for an office chair and sofa from the Toronto Freecycle group. As the holidays approach (okay, let’s face it, these requests can happen any time of the year), it’s interesting to see these outlandish requests for something pricey but free.
> We ate lahmacuns (alternatively spelled “lahmajoun”, a.k.a. Turkish pizza or “pide”)
> We couldn’t stop watching this mesmerizing show of a great graphic artist drawing logos (courtesy of The Girl).
> Our current word/phrase: “I like the flavour, but not the labour,” says the Girl, about foods that she likes (pomegranate, pommelo) and even about foods she doesn’t like (lobster, artichoke). Think about that during this holiday season of preparing foods.
> Funniest thing we heard on the radio/tv: this line from an imagined RomComCon: “I hope to go to the Canoe Pavilion with you. We can go out in the middle of the lake and get rained on.” (This, from one of the best originators of “fake news”, who unfortunately, now have to stamp almost every story with “SATIRE” in ALL CAPS, in case people can’t distinguish it from truly evil fake news in the world.)
> We learned that millennial moms love cloth diapers (just like non-millennial moms from years ago!). Granted, we never spent $$$ on “collectibles”, but it’s great to see that buying cloth diapers is addictive!
> We found this great web page about the most amazing-looking cakes.
> We found this interesting article that confirmed what we’ve always suspected: buttons that don’t work.

kelloggs-cereals> Finally, post-U.S.-election activity should include:
> understanding why it’s important to not normalize Trump
>
protesting with your wallet (here are alternatives to Trump-family-related businesses)
> seeing the ridiculousness and humour of the situation
> And buying Kellogg’s products!

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Post-Hump Day post: Detritus

This past week . . .

> We couldn’t stop watching 58 very good impressions by this guy (thanks to the Girl for finding this).
> We listened to this interview which confirmed that we’re not the only ones who are peeved by mispronunciations (really surprised that our favourite, “mischievious” wasn’t mentioned).
> Our current word/phrase: detritus (now properly pronounced, of course). As in, “The detritus that was spewed during the debate was hard to take.”
> Funniest thing we heard on the radio was this even-better-than-usual episode of “Because News”. Practically every joke was spot-on, and we think Ashley Botting was the star of the show who should have won.
> We ate homemade cookies and more cookies!
rubbermaid-lunch-containers-003
> We’re loving this product: our fantastic lunchbox system. Packing two lunches every day over the years, we’ve learned after many takes what works and what doesn’t work. This system is great because it’s modular, and the boxes and ice packs can be stacked in different ways for different meals and components.
> Our DIY project was these closet hanger space-savers. Rather than buy plastic ones like these (which are getting harder to find, anyway), we made our own with inexpensive chandelier chain ($1.64/foot) and S-hooks made from thick-gauge wire.closet-space-saver
> We learned some great parenting hacks. Even if our kids are past the age when most of these would be useful, and even if we’re finding it hard to read past number 5 on any given Buzzfeed listicle these days, this one had a few gems.
> And finally, we found this great web site for parents who want to sell on consignment all the stuff that their kids have outgrown and outplayed. Very well organised, takes a lot of the work out of your hands, and best of all, it’s parents running it for/with other parents. Look for one in a Canadian city near you!

 

Post-Hump Day Post: Giving Thanks for Never Giving You Up

This week, we gave thanks for . . .

pumpkin-spice-macarons
Part of our Thanksgiving spread: macarons with pumpkin-spice butter creme

> eating pumpkin spice macarons! This is the recipe that we used (but reduce the sugar to less than 300 g! It’s too sweet for my liking.) The Girl figured out her own pumpkin-spice-butter-creme icing recipe.
> not being able to stop watching the Pantsuit Power flash mob. Why is it that we can’t possible imagine any Trump supporters being this happy, dance-y, or fun? So of course, this led to . . .
>
not being able to stop listening to one of the big hits of this past summer. The Kids have loved this for the past few months, and even though I’m reminded of summer nights in the 80s, I have a love-hate relationship with the aching repetition of it. Speaking of hits of the 80s . . .
> learning that Rick Astley is touring again! Unfortunately, we just missed him when he was in town this weekend on his one and only Canadian stop. Here’s a review (with a great title) of another show on this tour. But don’t worry—he never gave up, and we can now all go out and get his new album to mark his 50th birthday. 50! Time flies . . .
> the funniest thing on the radio/tv, which was this age-old debate on buttons vs. zippers (skip to 14:00 if you’re not interested in Superman). Here, we get one of Steve’s best line: “And they said we would run out of topics by season 10. Wrong! We ran out in season 7.”
> little tricks for making the cracks on our glass surfaces disappear. The Husband had found out somewhere on-line (perhaps here) that this could work on eyeglasses. Though he was skeptical, we found that this really worked! I’m loving my restored watch crystals.
>
finding this great web site (thanks to an interview on CBC’s The Current) that contributes to the repair-it-yourself movement. While you’re at it, print this poster to keep in your workshop/home/store/general repair space.
> Also, if you haven’t been to a Repair Café session yet, find one asap at a library or community centre near you and thank them! They really do good, and next week is International Repair Café Week.

Best Canada Day guests

Getting a headstart on the long drive to Canada Day festivities, listening to the CBC, we heard an interesting piece about a poll conducted by the Historical Dominion Institute (yeah, I know—I haven’t heard of them either). They asked Canadians to list which famous Canadians, living or dead, they would invite to a Canada Day barbecue. (For the answer to the #1 choice, scroll to the bottom of this post.)

It made us think what a fun question this would be, to mull over on this Canada Day. Like one of those “Which famous people would you invite to dinner?” questions, only this one is restricted to only Canadian idols and heroes. So on this Canada Day, I challenge you to think of your five Canadian barbecue guests, and leave you with my five (in no particular order):

1) Mike Myers: Really funny, seemingly down-to-earth guy. Less frenetic than Jim Carey.

2) Alice Munro: I’ve already seen her in a live interview, and got to say a few words to her while getting her autograph on her latest book. Still, it would be marvelous to chat one-on-one with her in an informal setting.

3) Russ Peters: Who doesn’t love his ethnic comedy, sometimes tame, sometimes slightly offensive?

4) Peter Gzowski: Always was my dream to do something of significance, and be interviewed on “Morningside”. So sad when he died, and I had to let go of that dream.

5) Barenaked Ladies (which I’m counting as only one guest, but okay, if you restrict me to one person, then I guess it would have to be Ed Robertson.): Musical talent, and great sense of humour.

. . .

In the HDI poll, the #1 choice of Canadians was Terry Fox.